Wright County Board minutes 9/6/22

BOARD MINUTES
BOARD OF
WRIGHT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Tuesday, September 6, 2022
DATE APPROVED: SEPTEMBER 20, 2022
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 a.m. with Husom, Vetsch, Daleiden, Wetter, and Kaczmarek present.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 8/30/2022
Commisioner Mark Daleiden moved to approve the County Board minutes from Tuesday, August 30, 2022. The motion was seconded by Commisioner Darek Vetsch. The motion carried 5-0.
AGENDA
Vetsch requested to approve the Agenda. The motion was seconded by Commisioner Mary Wetter. The motion carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
Daleiden moved to approve the Consent Agenda. The motion was seconded by Wetter. The motion carried 5-0.
*Item removed for further discussion.
ITEMS REMOVED FROM THE CONSENT AGENDA FOR FURTHER DISCUSSION
A. ADMINSTRATION – FINANCE
1. Acknowledge Warrants Issued Between August 24, 2022 And August 30, 2022.
2. Motion To Approve The Reimbursement Of The American Rescue Plan Act Funds (ARP) As Follows:
County ARP Funds:
Approval Of County Reimbursement Of $285.29 From 01-099-493.6910 Transfer Out Into 01-100-493.5910 Transfer In As Follows:
$285.29 For Administrative Expenses-Staff Costs
B. ADMINISTRATION
1. Acknowledge Position Replacement Report.
2. Approve Separation Agreement.
3. Refer to Personnel Committee:
i. Combination Of Two Part-Time Positions In Health And Human Services.
C. PLANNING & ZONING
1. Refer Discussion On Township Ordinance Enforcement To The 9/13/2022 Planning And Zoning Committee Of The Whole.
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
ELIZABETH KARELS – PROJECT ADMINISTRATION
Approve The Use Agreement Between Wright County And Community Dental Care, Contingent Upon State Approval.  Authorize Staff To Accept Minor And Inconsequential Changes To The Agreement.
Project Administrator Elizabeth Karels said the Community Dental Care use agreement was first submitted at the board workshop in November 2021. She said after the discussion it was sent to the state for approval. She said that since that time the state had gone back and forth with Flaherty & Hood on changes. The result of those changes was the copy being voted on. She said the clinic would need this signed agreement in place to operate. She said the clinic planned to begin operation Friday, September 9, 2022.
Vetsch moved to approve the use agreement between Wright County and Community Dental Care, contingent upon state approval. Authorize staff to accept minor and inconsequential changes to the agreement. The motion was seconded by Daleiden. The motion carried 4-1. Commissioner Michael Kaczmarek was opposed.
GREG KRYZER – ATTORNEY
Approve Resolution Clarifying The Powers Of The Maple Lake Improvement District.
Assistant County Attorney John Bowen said the Maple Lake Improvement District was created by Resolution 17-60. He said the resolution needed to be amended. Bowen said 103b.551 in the resolution established some of the powers that a Lake Improvement District could undertake. Resolution 17-60 inadvertently omitted one of the powers. He said it needed to be added for clarification. Vetsch said he was not aware that the board had to delegate the powers to the district. Bowen said that since it was the board that had approved the resolution initially it meant that the board had to approve any changes. Kaczmarek said the control structures could get expensive and asked if there was a county ditch running through the district that the county could potentially get brought into for discussions or charges. Bowen said he was not aware of any ditch system or any other system that this could impact. Daleiden said the only issue was that the county owned land on the north side of the lake which could end up costing the county. He said Parks and Recreation was aware of this issue and had budgeted for it.
Vetsch moved to approve the resolution clarifying the powers of the Maple Lake Improvement District. The motion was seconded by Daleiden. The roll call vote was unanimous, and the motion passed 5-0.
PATTY WALETZKO – GREAT RIVER REGIONAL LIBRARY
Patty Waletzko Great River Regional Library 2023 Budget Presentation.
xecutive Director for Great River Regional Library (GRRL) Karen Pundsack said she was here to talk about past year’s activities and the 2023 budget. GRRL is a six-county system with 32 libraries which included “GRRL 2GO” in Sartell as a 33rd location. The libraries are in Benton, Morrison, Sherburne, Stearns, Todd, and Wright Counties. She said the GRRL updated its strategic plan in 2021. She said the plan maintained its core values, focusing on exceptional service, forward thinking, and community focus. She said the plan changed its strategic focus. She said the GRRL would be focusing on literacy, access, library awareness and operational excellence in the future. She said many people in the community did not know what services ae available. She said the GRRL added the Theory of Change, stating that people in the communities could find and use trusted information they needed to thrive. She said there were currently nine GRRL libraries in Wright County. She said in the past year seven locations added 16 hours per week. To offer these additional hours, many of the staff had to flex their personal commitments.
Pundsack said that Wright County was one of the biggest stake holders in the GRRL system. She said she was grateful to the current board, which included four members from Wright County, for their leadership on the budget. She said that in addition to Commissioner Christine Husom, Wright County was represented on the GRRL Board by Wayne Bauernschmitt, Jacey Wallace, and Melissa Fee. Pundsack said many of the programs available to the community were made possible with state funding. She said as a regional library system, GRRL is offering legacy programs throughout all its libraries highlighting cultural heritage programs. She said that over the summer of 2022, the GRRL offered more than 800 programs across the region to help children with reading.
Pundsack said the GRRL received Regional Library Telecommunications Aid (RLTA) from the state to connect all its computers to the statewide electronic infrastructure and support equity of access to electronic resources in part by ensuring that internet was available at all locations to all residents. She said in 2020 GRRL received an expansion for its available uses which allowed GRRL to offer hotspots for one-week check out in all locations. She said this was then expanded to allow a three-week checkout. She said if someone needed internet access, that person could use their library card to check out an internet hotspot for use at home. GRRL has been able to offer some amazing partnerships that are considered non-traditional library services. She said GRRL partnered with Twin Cities non-profit, Every Meal, to distribute food from each of its locations during Christmas, spring break and throughout the summer when kids were home from school. She said this partnership had been very rewarding. She said GRRL is always looking for community collaborations to enhance services for residents.
Pundsack said there was a formula between the six counties and its Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) to determine how much each county would pay in relation to other counties each year. This formula is based on population, number of borrowers, and net tax capacity. Wright County has increased in population and net tax capacity. Historically, Stearns County had been the highest funding county, but Wright County continues growing closer to overtaking it. When Wright County would surpass Stearns County then Wright County would take one of Stearns County’s board seats. She said the number of borrowers part of the formula was hard to predict as COVID impacted the library as residents were unable to come into the library to borrow books or register for library cards.
Pundsack said the third largest funding source behind Stearns County and Wright County was Regional Library Basic System Support Aid. This is the state aid received for being a regional public library system with at least three participating counties. She said one struggle GRRL faces is that the county needs to know the aid amount provided by the Regional Library Basic System Support Aid by August 1 to determine the impact on the tax levy, but the support amount was not known until after August 1. Pundsack said the state aid fluctuated by up to $100,000 each year so the GRRL Board was forced to guess on 17 percent of the budget each year.
Pundsack said there were parts of the budget that were beginning to shrink. One of these is cash reserves. She said for 2023, cash reserves were at 2 percent of the budget and carryover from 2022 was 3 percent. She said surplus had in the past been added to cash reserves at the end of the year but was now being integrated into the next year’s budget with the goal of decreasing county responsibility. She said that at one point the GRRL had about six and a half months of cash reserves which had increased to seven months before the board said it was time to reduce the cash reserves. She said for 2022 there was $700,000 of cash reserve and surplus, and for the 2023 budget it had been reduced to $500,000. The third revenue line, interest, had taken a hit due to COVID. The balance had at one time been a six-digit number. She said it was slowly coming back. She said the GRRL was trying to be very deliberate with the budget so counties would not need to carry too much of the burden.
Pundsack said more than 70 percent of the budget went to personnel. She said there are two unions representing GRRL staff and both are up for renewal this year. She said the GRRL is in the process of beginning the negotiations with the unions. She said they wanted to be fair to their staff while being fair to the taxpayers.
Pundsack said the 2023 budget is $10 million. She said the budget included $230,000 in reserves and $313,860 in 2021 surplus carryover. She said there is a 3 percent increase over 2022 for GRRL and a 7 percent increase in cost for Wright County. She said GRRL has one of the most cost-effective ways of providing library services by having one central budget over 32 locations. She said library dollars provided per capita for Wright County were $16.53 which was on the high side for GRRL due to how the formula worked out this year. She said that statewide library dollars per capita is $39.41. Pundsack thanked the board for Wright County’s contributions.
Daleiden asked how many of the “Wifi2GO” devices were in use. Pundsack said more than 120 devices are currently in use over the 32 locations. She said GRRL is constantly adding more, but the devices took some time to set up. She said all locations had the wi-fi devices available to residents for a one-week check out on demand or a three-week check out which would be floated to its location from a different library. Daleiden asked if more devices were being kept where there had been less internet coverage? She said GRRL started keeping the wi-fi hotspots where there was less coverage. She said there was also American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding available for libraries with a parking lot attached allowing people to utilize the wi-fi access from the parking lot even when the library was closed. Wetter asked how many libraries Stearns County and Sherburne County respectively had. Pundsack said Stearns has 10 libraries including the St Cloud library which is 118,000 square feet and all the other libraries could fit inside. She said 80 percent of the users at St Cloud were from Sherburne and 20 percent were from Benton County. Sherburne County has three libraries.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
ADMINISTRATION
Topics For Discussion At The County Board Workshop On Tuesday, September 13.
Kelly presented the following topics:
I. Budget 2023
II. Gravel Tax Policy
III. Fair Audit
County Administrator Lee Kelly said there were no additions to the workshop from Administration. Wetter said in talking to the public there was concern over the sale of current compost equipment that had not been replaced. She said part of the concern was that there had been no staff in charge of the compost plant for a year and was concerned the staff did not have what was needed to do their jobs.
Kelly said he would provide an overview of what had been sold on the auction so far. He said there had been a walk through with staff regarding items needed and items not needed. He said he would provide this to the committee.
COMMITTEE MINUTES
911 COMMITTEE MINUTES (08/30/2022)
Kaczmarek said the August 30 meeting was the first 911 Committee meeting in two years and the first he had attended. He said the topic was new workstations and other updates needed for the Law Enforcement Center (LEC) Communication Center. He said there were questions answered about where the money came from. He said the 911 Fund goes to pay for workstations, training and software and was a fee collected from every cell phone user in the county. Kaczmarek said the committee desired to replace the carpeting and lighting but required extra funds not from the 911 Fund. He said the carpet would be about 2,600 square feet and Facilities Director Alan Wilczek would be getting prices for new carpet and presenting to the committee for consideration. Wilczek also said the cost of the lighting would be minimal and handled in-house by the county electrician.
Kaczmarek said there were two changes to the minutes. He did not say that the selling of the towers would help offset the cost of the carpet and lighting, he said this was a separate point and not related to the cost of carpeting or lighting. He reviewed the four recommendations reiterating that Wilczek would let the committee know what it would cost to replace the carpet and lighting. He also wanted to add that Wilczek had mentioned there was the option to jack up the workstations at a later date to replace carpeting if it was not possible to replace the carpet during the upcoming workstation replacement. He said the committee selected Watson Consoles $230,000 bid to replace the current workstations. Daleiden asked if the board was looking for someone to dismantle the towers if sold. Husom said if the towers were no longer being used than the county would need someone to take them apart.
Kaczmarek moved to approve the 911 Committee Minutes with the changes mentioned. The motion was seconded by Daleiden. The motion carried 5-0.
I. Replacement Options for Workstations in LEC Communications Center
a. Watson – Current Vendor
Captain Ryan Ferguson said there were three bids received to replace the Communications Center workstations. Watson Consoles, Russ Bassett Corporation and Motorola provided bids. Ferguson said Watson provided three prices to consider, $160,000, $230,000, and $280,000, along with two different workstation configurations. He said Watson included a 10-year warranty on all third-party parts and a lifetime warranty on all parts manufactured in-house. Ferguson said Watson had a better configuration for the space being used. Communications 911/Public Service Answering Point (PSAP) Manager Haley DuBois said the layouts provided by Watson took into consideration future staff growth.
b. Russ Bassett
DuBois said Carver County recently had Russ Bassett install new workstations into its 911 Communication Center. She visited Carver County and said the workstations did not look sturdy. She also said Russ Bassett only included a 10-year warranty. Ferguson said the recommendation moving forward would be to award the bid to Watson. Of the three prices Watson quoted, he recommended accepting the $230,000 bid.
c. Additional Needs of Communication Center
Sheriff Sean Deringer asked where the funding would come from for the new workstations and if there were any rules on its use. Ferguson said that all phones able to dial 911 in the state were charged a 911 fee that the state collected and issued to the county of residence. Sheriff’s Office Business Manager Shawna Athman said the fund these fees went into was able to cover most expenses associated with the 911 dispatch center such as workstations, computers, training, and software. She said the 911 fund did not cover personnel or lighting and carpeting. Athman said over the last two years the 911 fund had doubled which made the current project possible. She said Computer-Aided Dispatch (CAD), power, phone, and maintenance contracts for phone loggers and recorders were paid out of the 911 fund.
DuBois said the Communication Center had seven workstations with space for an eighth. She said the current staffing level was at seven but had been approved for eight in 2018. She said the Watson bid was for the installation of eight workstations.
Commissioner Michael Kaczmarek asked if the workstations were able to be reused elsewhere or sold. DuBois said the old workstations would be disposed of. Deringer said the workstations would be of no use. DuBois said that these were just the workstations. The radio consoles were not included in this order.
RECOMMENDATION: Accept the bid from Watson Consoles for $230,000 to provide eight workstations in the Law Enforcement Center (LEC) Communications Center.
II. Discuss Future Sheriff’s Office Facilities Projects, Expenses, and Needs
a. Communications Unit Radio Consoles
Deringer asked if the radio consoles would be able to be reused when the county radios went encrypted. Emergency Management Director Seth Hansen said the radio consoles currently used would be able to handle all future updates but would not interact with new radio consoles. Hansen said there were five radio consoles in the LEC Communications Center and three in the Training Center Communications Center. When new radio consoles were purchased, the new consoles would be installed at the Training Center. The three replaced radio consoles would then be installed in the LEC.
Commissioner Christine Husom asked for clarification on what was being purchased first. DuBois said the workstations were being purchased first with the recommendation to go with the $230,000 bid from Watson. She said there would be about a four-month turnaround from order to installation. She said there would be quite a bit of coordination needed during that time.
Deringer asked how many consoles were at the backup location. Dubois said there were four workstations, however only three were equipped with radio consoles. The fourth was able to access CAD and answer phones but had no radio access. Ferguson said there were two similar stations in the LEC Communications Center with phone and CAD access but no radio console.
Deringer asked if, during the installation of new workstations in the Communications Center, facilities would have a chance to replace the carpet. DuBois said the plan was to pull carpeting during the installation as it would be the first opportunity in 15 years. She said that if it was not done then, the carpet would be 30 years old before another opportunity to replace it came up. Ferguson asked if the carpet would be paid with 911 funds. DuBois said the carpeting could not be paid for out of the 911 fund. DuBois said she thought carpet squares would be best for the room as carpet squares were less expensive and easier to replace than carpet rolls.
DuBois said lighting needed to be replaced in the Communication Center. She said there had been an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issue due to the location of the lights in relation to the workstations. She said it would be necessary to ensure each workstation was properly lit. Facilities Director Alan Wilczek said a funding source would need to be found for the lighting and carpet. He said the lighting would be relatively inexpensive for the county and he would work on determining the cost. He said that it would be possible to lift the workstations with a furniture jack at a later date to replace the carpet underneath if replacing it did not get done when the workstations were being replaced.
Husom asked if the $230,000 would be completely covered by the 911 fund. DuBois said all the workstations would be covered but said the radio consoles and the radios would need to be updated soon as well. Athman said the replacement of radios would cost around $300,000 to $500,000. She said there was a question about whether the switching of the CAD system from Zuercher Technologies to Oracle would be able to be paid for out of the 911 fund. Athman said Oracle should know costs by the end of the year so it could be determined if the funds existed for this project. Deringer said the funding for the workstations was complete with his only concern being other future projects depleting the 911 fund. Hansen said the 911 fund was being replenished at the rate of $48,000 a month. Athman said more would be known when numbers from Oracle were set.
Kaczmarek said after speaking with the Finance Department he was not comfortable spending any additional money on this project. He said he did not want to cover the cost of new carpeting or lighting. Wilczek said the lighting would be done in-house with the staff electrician. Husom asked how many square feet the communications center was. Wilczek said with the side offices the square footage was 2,600. He said he would put together a proposal on the cost of replacing the carpet. Husom asked if the carpet squares were more expensive than a carpet roll. Wilczek said that due to the ease of installation and replacement carpet squares were less expensive.
RECOMMENDATION: Determine cost of replacing carpet and lighting in LEC Communication Center.
II. Update 911 Committee Plan and Contact Information
DuBois said that the 911 Committee Plan and contact information were required to be on file with the state. She said the plan was up to date except for the members of the 911 Committee. She said former Commissioner Charlie Borrell was replaced by Kaczmarek, and former Assistant County Administrator Susan Vergin was replaced by Assistant County Administrator Clay Wilfahrt. County Administrator Lee Kelly said that former Information Technology (IT) Director Adam Tagarro was replaced by IT Director Matthew Fomby. He said Planning and Zoning Director Sean Riley had retired. DuBois asked if having new Planning and Zoning Director Barry Rhineberger on the Committee was necessary. Kelly recommended including Rhineberger only when he was needed. DuBois said former Sheriff’s Captain Dan Anselment was replaced by Ferguson. She said former Operations Captain Todd Hoffman was replaced by Chief Deputy Matthew Treichler.
DuBois said the full committee was Kaczmarek, Husom, Wilfahrt, Fomby, DuBois, Ferguson, Hansen, Graphical Information Systems (GIS) Director Alek Halverson, Treichler, Athman, Wilczek, Risk Manager Tim Dahl, and Telecom Specialist Mark Staller. She said she would update the state.
RECOMMENDATION: Update the 911 Committee Plan and Contact Information on file with the state.
Kaczmarek asked about two radio towers, one at the old government center and one at Public Works, which were owned by the county and no longer used. He said if the towers were no longer in use could they be sold. Wilczek said he would look into it. Kaczmarek requested an additional recommendation be added to the committee minutes to ensure follow-up.
RECOMMENDATION: Determine if there was value in selling two Wright County-owned radio towers.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE / ADVISORY BOARD UPDATES
County Administrator Lee Kelly
Kelly said he was working toward final resolution for the budget to be presented on Tuesday, September 20.
Commissioner Michael Kaczmarek The Highway 12 Safety Commission met on Thursday, September 1 and went over crash totals for the year. He said there were almost 40 less crashes than 2021. He said crashes were mostly due to speed, alcohol, or drug use. Highway 12 was scheduled to reopen on Thursday, September 15 east of Delano after being closed for the summer. He said there were grants available for local bus companies to apply for to purchase cameras for school buses to help with the capture of school bus stop bar violators. He said it would be good to let companies in the area know. Husom said there were a few companies in the area who had used this grant to purchase cameras and it had worked well.
Commissioner Darek Vetsch
Vetsch and Wetter looked at four different gravel locations on Wednesday, August 31. Vetsch said they looked at small scale, large scale and asphalt plants. He said it was very insightful. He said there was a lot of information to discuss later.
Commissioner Mary Wetter
Wetter had a Central Minnesota Council on Aging (CMCOA) meeting where they heard from CliftonLarsonAllen (CLA) on the financial audit. She said everything was fine with the audit. She said the CMCOA had money for many services but not the employees or volunteers to carry out the services. Wetter said the CMCOA had more than $109,000 in unawarded Title 3b funds. She said the CMCOA awarded the funds to some of its providers, focusing on homemaker and assisted transportation services. She said Wright County Community Action (WCCA) received some of these funds. Wetter said the committee heard about a program to help seniors combat loneliness while allowing caregivers time to perform needed tasks by providing them with a robotic pet. She said the cost was about $120 per pet. She said there were 37 utilized in the community.
The meeting adjourned at 9:40 a.m.
County Board Minutes submitted by Phil Hodges, Administrative Specialist.
WARRANTS FOR PUBLICATION
Warrants Approved On 8/24/2022 For Payment 8/24/2022
Vendor Name Amount
CST DISTRIBUTION LLC 2,394.63
GROUP HEALTH PLAN, INC 31,617.49
MN COUNTIES COMPUTER
COOPERATIVE 35,000.00
OERTEL ARCHITECTS LTD 31,692.00
OFFISOURCE, INC. 30,100.00
TRI-DIM FILTER CORP 3,341.23
WM CORPORATE SERVICES, INC. 4,215.50
WRIGHT HENNEPIN ELECTRIC 3,351.21
28 payments less than 2000 18,077.07
Final total 159,789.13
Warrants Approved For Payment 8/24/2022
WEX BANK 32,635.04
Final total 32,635.04
Warrants Approved On 8/24/2022 For Payment 8/24/2022
US BANK-PROCUREMENT CARDS 72,501.44
Final total 72,501.44
Warrants Approved On 8/25/2022 For Payment 8/25/2022
ALADTEC INC 4,770.00
CONSTELLATION JUSTICE SYSTEMS 5,053.00
HENNEPIN COUNTY TREASURER 2,025.97
NEOGOV 10,764.04
33 payments less than 2000 9,925.16
Final total 32,538.17
Warrants Approved On 8/26/2022 For Payment 8/26/2022
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 8,683.34
CHAMBERLAIN OIL CO 4,391.63
CI TECHNOLOGIES INC 2,856.00
CORRECTION DENTISTRY LLC 2,413.00
COTTENS INC 2,615.82
EDLUND/LUKE 3,000.00
INTEGRIPRINT 2,269.10
J & J GLASS & GLAZING INC 2,166.92
MINNESOTA NATIVE
LANDSCAPES INC 3,100.00
OFFICE OF MN IT SERVICES 3,560.83
OMANN BROTHERS INC 52,623.69
PLAGGERMAN/MARGARET M 3,534.30
PRESIDIO NETWORKED
SOLUTIONS GROUP 2,117.98
SUBURBAN TIRE WHOLESALE INC 5,362.34
THOMSON REUTERS WEST
PUBLISHING 2,732.13
45 payments less than 2000 25,310.27
Final total 126,737.35
Warrants Approved On 8/26/2022 For Payment 8/26/2022
AFSCME LOCAL 2685 3,933.04
AIG RETIREMENT COMPANY 8,181.92
HARTFORD 25,187.89
HEALTH PARTNERS 47,405.49
ING 13,970.30
LOCAL 320 4,058.00
MG TRUST COMPANY 3,765.00
MN BENEFIT ASSOCIATION 2,337.22
MN CHILD SUPPORT
PAYMENT CENTER 3,253.50
NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT
SOLUTIONS 4,232.30
PUBLIC EMP RETIREMENT ASSN 397,535.52
WRIGHT CO CAFETERIA PLAN 31,359.96
10 payments less than 2000 6,505.38
Final total 551,725.52
Warrants Approved On 8/26/2022 For Payment 8/26/2022
MN DEPARTMENT OF
NATURAL RESOURCES 3,133.21
QUADIENT LEASING USA, INC. 7,500.00
Final total 10,633.21
Warrants Approved On 8/29/2022 For Payment 8/29/2022
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 8,763.57
ERGOTECH CONTROLS INC 43,930.63
GUARDIAN FLEET SAFETY LLC 2,660.00
MEND CORRECTIONAL
CARE PLLC 107,011.31
MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS INC 63,113.26
TACTICAL ADVANTAGE LLC 4,335.00
14 payments less than 2000 6,053.69
Final total 235,867.46
Warrants Approved For Payment 8/29/2022
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (IRS) 499,758.95
MN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 98,658.39
Final total 598,417.34
Warrants Approved On 8/30/2022 For Payment 8/30/2022
CENTERPOINT ENERGY 5,495.84
GRANITE CITY WINDOW
CLEANING INC 4,900.00
HELLMAN’S OUTDOOR
SERVICES INC 14,667.50
SILVER CREEK TOWNSHIP 2,569.65
11 payments less than 2000 5,958.10
Final total 33,591.09
Warrants Approved On 8/30/2022 For Payment 8/30/2022
COKATO MHC, LLC 4,482.61
1 payment less than 2000 322.00
Final total 4,804.61
Published in the Herald Journal, Sept. 23, 2022. |

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