Archive for Howard Lake

HLWW FFA plant sale May 9-10

HOWARD LAKE, WAVERLY, WINSTED, MN – Members of Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted High School FFA will be selling plants in the greenhouse at HLWW High School Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Go on the Facebook page to set up a time.

Howard Lake water report

See the City of Howard Lake water report here.

Middleville Township public hearings

Notice of Public Hearing
Notice is hereby given, that on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 the Middleville Township Board of Adjustment will hold a hearing at the Middleville Township Hall at 7:00 pm to consider the following item:
James and Jeanette Fiedler are requesting a lot line variance. They wish to reduce their 5 acre building site at 586 Co Rd 5 SW, PID 212-000-053201, down to 3 acres. This requires a variance because the rear line would only be 25 feet from the shed and by ordinance the rear setback is 50 feet. This property is part of the SW quarter of Section 5, Middleville Township, Wright County.
Such persons that desire to be heard with reference to the proposed variance will be heard at this time. If you do not attend the hearing or submit written comment, it will be assumed that you have no objections to the proposal.
Middleville Board of Adjustment
Joey Berg, Clerk
Published in the Herald Journal, May 1 and 8, 2020.

Notice of Public Hearing
Notice is hereby given, that on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 the Middleville Township Board of Adjustment will hold a hearing at the Middleville Township Hall at 7:00 pm to consider the following item:
Arvid and Violet Luhman are requesting a lot size variance. They wish to split their 160 acre farm at 5384 Co Rd 7 SW, PID 212-000-352300, in to 5 parcels, of which 4 will contain one building entitlement. The parcel which will contain the existing building site will be about 24 acres and 2 others will be 20 acres. Ordinance allows up to 10 acres for a building site, thus the need for variance. This property is the NW quarter of Section 35, Middleville Township, Wright County.
Such persons that desire to be heard with reference to the proposed variance will be heard at this time. If you do not attend the hearing or submit written comment, it will be assumed that you have no objections to the proposal.
Middleville Board of Adjustment
Joey Berg, Clerk
Published in the Herald Journal, May 1 and 8, 2020.

Wright County spring load restrictions to end soon

WRIGHT COUNTY – The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MNDoT) will end spring load restrictions in the central frost zone, which includes the highways on the Wright County highway system, Monday, May 4 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

City of Howard Lake to review resignation and release of claims of employee Timothy Kosek tonight

HOWARD LAKE – A continuation meeting of the Howard Lake City Council has been slated for Tuesday, April 28, at 7 p.m.

Following a closed session relating to the performance of city employee Timothy Kosek, the
mayor and council directed staff to draft a resignation and release of claims between the city and the employee.  The document was to provide for the following:
- Effective resignation date of May 2, 2020.
- Releases the City from claims of the resigning party.
- Releases the employee from claims of the employer.
- Permits the payment of accrued paid-time-off.
- Prohibits the employee from seeking unemployment benefits.
- At request of Kosek, includes a letter of recommendation.

The primary agenda items for tonight’s meeting include: “Consider Approval of Resignation & Release of Claims;” and “Consider Personnel Appointments within the Public Works Department.”

Kosek has been employed by the city since approximately 2001.

The meeting will take place via the GoToMeeting video conferencing platform.

 

Wright County Fair in jeopardy, organizers still hopeful

WRIGHT COUNTY – Less than two months ago, plans were going full steam ahead for the 150th anniversary of the Wright County Fair, scheduled for July 22-26, at the Wright County Fairgrounds in Howard Lake.

Special anniversary-themed events were being planned. Prize giveaways were getting firmed up. Kids were going to get in free. It was setting up to be the biggest, best-attended county fair in its history.

But, as COVID-19 has effectively shut down any event where people gather, much less events that attract thousands of people, there is growing concern that the fair will need to be cancelled at some point.

However, as Commissioner Charlie Borrell said at Wednesday’s meeting of the Wright County Board of Commissioners, that time isn’t yet.

“We’re going to hold off as far as canceling until as late as we can,” Borrell said. “I know there was a deadline to print the fair guidebook. But, I had (Assistant County Attorney Greg Kryzer) look into it and they can actually do a digital edition as close as three weeks before the fair. It’s something we’re going to have to consult with the county board and the fair board will have to work with us. If COVID-19 is still hanging around and it cuts attendance down 20 percent, it would be a huge loss. It may be such a thing that we wait until next year to have our 150th anniversary. But, we don’t need to make a decision just yet.”

The guidebook component is important because of a state law with the Minnesota Agricultural Society (also known as the State Fair Board) that requires counties that receive grant money to assist in the operation of the fair, a guidebook must be printed. But, the potential decision on whether the plug gets pulled on the 2020 Wright County Fair may be out of Wright County’s control.

The company that operates the midway, like all vendors that work the fair circuit, is shut down and there are questions that, even if Wright County opts to go ahead with the fair, if there’s no midway, it will be closed down by force, not choice.

A worst-case scenario would be putting on the 150th anniversary of the fair and having a poor turnout.

“To be honest, we’re scared,” Borrell said. “If we drop anything more than 10 percent from last year’s numbers, we’re in the red and losing money. We need to have our numbers up to do anything more than break even. It’s a scary situation.”

The fair board has bought time prior to having to make a final decision, but economics could play a major factor. To cancel the fair wouldn’t be the financial loss that a public gathering with the cloud of COVID-19 hanging over it would potentially be.

Unless the situation takes a turn for the better quickly, that possibility becomes more of a likelihood.

“There would be some costs associated with maintaining the fairgrounds if we don’t have the fair, but most of the expenses are things we bring in and things we do,” Borrell said. “It would basically be a neutral money proposition. We wouldn’t lose a lot of money like we would if we put on the fair and attendance was way down. There are going to be discussions about what is the best course of action.”

In the event there isn’t a 2020 Wright County Fair, unlike spring sports, proms and graduations, it doesn’t mean the 150thanniversary would come and go without the typical fanfare. If charted by year, 2020 would actually be the 152nd Great Wright County Get-Together. For two years during World War II, the Wright County Fairgrounds served as a prisoner of war camp for German soldiers and there was no county fair.

Borrell is trying to hold out hope and there is still time for the currently grim short-term future to change – even if it looks like a longshot.

“If the worst happens, it will still be the 150th Wright County Fair the next time we have one,” Borrell said. “That could be in 2021. We just want to put off canceling it as long as we can and, as of now, we don’t have a ‘drop-dead’ date. There are some developments that could happen in the next month or two that changes the game and the lockdowns end. We won’t be fighting over ventilators and hospital bed space. Maybe it’s just wishful thinking, but that’s what we’re hoping for now.”